Private: Mind the Great Divide

Opening Reception
Saturday May 9, 2020 - 2pm to 5pm

Artist Talk with Janet Dey and Dianne Lister
Saturday May 30, 2020 - 2pm to 4am

  • (left) Fort Benton, Missouri River, Montana (bright orange reflection in water), 2012, Janet Dey; (right) Orange Truck (against white abandoned buildings), Livingston, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister
  • (left) Yellowstone River (moody dark sky), Emigrant, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister; (right) Chronicle Mailbox, Chico, Montana, 2019 Janet Dey
  • (left) Rear View (side mirror), Paradise Valley, Montana, 2019, Janet Dey; (right) Cow and Truck, Bozeman Ranch, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister
Previous Images
  • (left) Fort Benton, Missouri River, Montana (bright orange reflection in water), 2012, Janet Dey; (right) Orange Truck (against white abandoned buildings), Livingston, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister
  • (left) Yellowstone River (moody dark sky), Emigrant, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister; (right) Chronicle Mailbox, Chico, Montana, 2019 Janet Dey
  • (left) Rear View (side mirror), Paradise Valley, Montana, 2019, Janet Dey; (right) Cow and Truck, Bozeman Ranch, Montana, 2019, Dianne Lister
Next Images

Janet Dey and Dianne Lister

Opening Reception: May 9, 2020 @2pm to 5pm, with an Artist walk-through @3:30 pm

Mind the Great Divide is a new body of work developed by Janet Dey and Dianne Lister out of two trips to Montana and the dialogues they sparked. Their work explores the ever-widening divisions evident within the natural and built environments and reveals disparities that have an impact on humanity and the ecosystem.

Their journey began in 2012 with the intention to travel across the Continental Divide, photograph the glaciers before they melt, and experience the wilderness of the Going-to-the-Sun Road before heading east to North Dakota. They witnessed environmental degradation, abandoned farms and churches, and towns left devastated by deep economic and social change. They felt unsettled by a permeating gun culture, and they were struck by the evident effects of agribusiness, extreme drought, wildfires, and fracking. Their original expectations eroded, and their conversations turned towards issues of loss, beauty, fear, and shifts in values. The work from this original trip was exhibited as a part of the 2013 Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

In the years following, divisions have expanded, and global warnings have become urgent alarms. Trump was elected, Greta Thunberg emerged, and the UN passed the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People. California and Australia burned, icecaps receded further, entire species have been compromised, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch grew, and humans have experienced increased conflict and fear.

In 2019, Dey and Lister returned to Montana to witness and document the impact of seven years of changes. Using photography, video, and text, Mind the Great Divide focuses on the scope of inequities and divisions, and our place as mindful humans.

 

Janet Dey is a Toronto-based visual artist whose work explores matters of the mind, time, and our talent for invention and elaboration. Her work often integrates photographs, text, and fiber to explore concepts and deepen ideas. Through photography, painting, sculpture, drawing and fiber arts, her lifelong study has focused on the figure. Technical skills developed with fiber and Japanese paper include hand and machine embroidery, weaving, and bookmaking.

Dey was a senior executive in public and private real property, taught at York University, chaired a committee of the National Capital Commission and was on the Boards of Sheridan College and Factory Theatre.

Dey is represented by Stephen Bulger Gallery, Toronto. Her hand-stitched photographs were shown in Adoptive (2018) and Magic (2020). Her work can be found in private collections in Canada and the US.

 

Dianne Lister is a Bobcaygeon based photographer interested in exploring pattern, symbolism, and storytelling, often in remote settings. She has been experimenting with photography and mixed media since 1991. Her recent work reflects upon the tension between life experienced in rural environments and related global themes.

Lister has exhibited with both the Contact and Spark Photo Festivals. Her work has also been shown at the Dufferin County Museum, and in Creemore, Toronto and Peterborough. Most recently, she exhibited with Michael Harris at the Kawartha Art Gallery in Lindsay.

Lister is very active in the arts community and has sat on many boards in the cultural sector including the Kawartha Lakes Arts Council and the McMichael Canadian Art Collection. She currently sits on the Board of Directors for the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough.