Painted Words: Eugenie Fernandes

Opening Reception
Saturday July 13, 2019 - 2pm to 4pm

  • Eugenie Fernandes, Anchors, 2019, acrylic on canvas
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  • Eugenie Fernandes, Anchors, 2019, acrylic on canvas
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Eugenie Fernandes is a celebrated artist and children’s author. Fernandes has illustrated more than 100 books for children, the most recent being A Likkle Miss Lou and written and illustrated nineteen including the soon to be released Finding Lucy. She grew up as she lives, surrounded by trees and water and art. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings and her family, Fernandes’s works have inspired generations of readers.

There is a challenge to writing about a children’s book illustrator and writer. Their work, if experienced as a child or a guardian, holds an intimate connection; perhaps it offered guidance or provided a catalyst for imagined journeys. Those things can be difficult to articulate but if you know the work of Eugenie Fernandes, you know. Her painted and sculptural illustrations are able to capture the charming, chaotic, and contemplative moments of her characters’ lives and those of other authors.

This new body of work by is an exploration of the expressive qualities of colour, composition, and texture. A physical manuscript, the exhibition can be read from left to right, each acrylic painting with its accompanying verse. A meditation and an invitation, this exhibition includes an interactive component that offers the audience a way to imagine, create, and express using the mediums of art and words. Join in and contribute to the ever changing felt artwork, add to the poetry wall, or simply sit, read, and enjoy.

 

Born on Long Island, Eugenie Fernandes attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Initially, Fernandes showed her portfolio of illustrations to publishers. Before long she began to submit stories with her illustrations. This led to the publication in 1981 of Fenandes’ first book, Jenny’s Surprise Summer. Her paintings from Earth Magic and One Hen: How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference are at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art.