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Watershed

  • Mary Anne Barkhouse, Dark Water, Safe Harbour, silver, peltogyne wood On loan from the Crown Collection, National Capital Commission photograph by Keith Betteridge
  • Olivia Whetung, Eulogy, 2023, installation. On loan from the artist. Photo by Toni Hafkenscheid.
  • Olivia Whetung, tibewh (detail,) 2017, 10/0 Czech seed beads, nylon thread, canvas, aluminum push pins. On loan from the Indigenous Art Collection National Juried Art Acquisition, 2020-21 501126 A-PP
  • Stan Olthius, Resonance, 2024, laser printed raw canvas, found fibreglass kayak, stones, foraged deer antlers
Previous Images
  • Mary Anne Barkhouse, Dark Water, Safe Harbour, silver, peltogyne wood On loan from the Crown Collection, National Capital Commission photograph by Keith Betteridge
  • Olivia Whetung, Eulogy, 2023, installation. On loan from the artist. Photo by Toni Hafkenscheid.
  • Olivia Whetung, tibewh (detail,) 2017, 10/0 Czech seed beads, nylon thread, canvas, aluminum push pins. On loan from the Indigenous Art Collection National Juried Art Acquisition, 2020-21 501126 A-PP
  • Stan Olthius, Resonance, 2024, laser printed raw canvas, found fibreglass kayak, stones, foraged deer antlers
Next Images

Mary Anne Barkhouse, John Boyle, Brad Copping, Liz Magor, Stan Olthuis, Amanda Strong, and Olivia Whetung

June 26 – October 6, 2024

 

“In waterways, there is a constant flow of intergenerational knowledge passing through the lakes, rivers and oceans; every body of water holds a spirit, a history and informs the land.” – [1]  Shannon Webb-Campbell, 2017

The Art Gallery of Peterborough is situated on the shores of the Otonabee/Odenabe River at Little Lake, near the location of a traditional Anishinaabe portage site, and across the water from the newly opened Canadian Canoe Museum.

The natural flow and positioning of these waters were altered by the Trent-Severn Waterway which spans 386 kilometers and connects Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay. The construction of Lock 21, designated as the Peterborough Lift Lock, was the highest hydraulic system of its kind for years, and operates, “like a system of dams constricting and constraining and controlling what the river can do….”[2]. These large locks block the traditional pathways of schools of salmon who would travel up the Odenabe to Stoney Lake each year.

“Watershed” builds upon this context, and considers the ways in which power dynamics teeter at the surface of the water.

 

RELATED EVENT:

Opening Reception: Wednesday, June 26 from 7:00 – 9:00 pm

 


[1] Webb-Campbell, S. (2017). “Reclaiming Indigenous Territories, Bead by Bead” in Canadian Art (June 2017). <https://canadianart.ca/reviews/olivia-whetung-tibewh/>

[2] Simpson, L. (2008). Lighting the Eighth Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence, and Protection of Indigenous Nations. Winnipeg: Arbeiter Ring Publishing. Pp 206-7. s. Winnipeg: Arbeiter Ring Publishing. Pp 206-7.

Regular Hours: Wednesday to Sunday from 11 am to 5 pm. Admission is by Donation.

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